Tag Archives: Late-harvest wine

RECIPE: Pistachio and Coconut Pain Perdu

on May 14, 2014

This is a simple traditional French dessert with a little twist. This pain perdu is a livened up French Toast – the secret lies in allowing the bread to soufflé slightly in the oven so it has a wonderful, smooth texture in the center. By crusting the bread with toasted coconut and roasted pistachios, it brings a tropical flavor to the dish that complements Dolce very nicely.

Pistachio and Coconut Pain Perdu

Serves 8; Two halves per person

Ingredients

1 cup pistachios, finely chopped

¼ cup shredded coconut, finely chopped

1 loaf of dense bread or Texas toast, unsliced

5 eggs

1 cup sugar

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 can coconut milk

2 tablespoons dark rum

1 tablespoon butter

Vanilla or caramel ice cream

METHOD

Mix the pistachios and shredded coconut and spread onto a dinner plate. Set aside. Slice bread into 1-inch thick slices. Blend together eggs, sugar, salt, vanilla, coconut milk and rum then pour into a shallow bowl. Immerse the slices of bread in the liquid and soak for two minutes, remove, and allow excess liquid to drip off. Press the bread down onto the pistachio and coconut mixture, then flip over and repeat, being careful not to knock off the coating.

In a skillet pan on medium heat, add a tablespoon of butter and coat the pan. Sear both sides of the bread until golden brown, then remove and place on a sheet pan. Bake the bread at 325ºF until the bread starts to puff up or “soufflé” –this should take about six to ten minutes. Allow to cool for several minutes, then slice diagonally and serve with vanilla or caramel ice cream. Enjoy!

Have you tried any of Chef Trevor Eliason’s recipes? Share your creations with us on Facebook or Twitter!

How We Enjoy Dolce: Custards, Puddings & Creams

on March 17, 2014

With rich flavors of honey, caramel, stone fruit and pineapple, one would think that Dolce is a dessert in itself. This could be true – it may be all you need to end a special meal. Then, the waiter tempts you with fresh bread pudding, or your eyes are drifting to the crème brûlée on the dessert menu. Can you have too much of a good thing? We say nay! Simply remember to keep your dessert less sweet than the wine.

Read on for more tips on enjoying Dolce with desserts that are more luscious than light.

Brulee

Style & Preparation
Crème brûlée, crème caramel, tiramisu, petit pots à la crème, soufflés, flan, ice cream, bread puddings, ice soufflés, crème anglaise, puddings (try butterscotch).

Cooking Techniques
Eggs combined with milk or cream creates a velvety texture… Delicious with Dolce! However, too much egg or cream in the dessert can overpower the wine and seem heavy.

Sweetness
For a delicate balance with Dolce, create lightly sweet and gently rich desserts. Very sweet desserts that are also rich will seem cloying and dense.

Tartness
Add fresh fruit, fruit coulis or sauce (such as raspberry, orange, or lemon) to a dessert that is rich. This slight acidic accent will contrast the creamy richness in the dessert and create a beautiful match with Dolce.

Cream & Richness
Avoid garnishing these desserts with additional cream. When measuring and cooking, it is better to have more cream than egg.

Tips & Notes
If the dessert is rich: Use less sugar. Use as little egg as possible, and use natural sugars.

Don’t forget to tweet your Dolce pairing experiences to @DolceWine!

Video: 2013 Dolce Harvest: Sauvignon Blanc

on October 17, 2013

Enjoy this behind-the-scenes clip of the Dolce harvest! Winemaker Greg Allen walks us through processing and fermenting Sauvignon Blanc for the 2013 blend.

It’s Only Just Begun…

on September 18, 2013

Were you expecting a harvest post from Dolce this early in the year? As much as we would love to celebrate harvest with our sister wineries, it is simply not our time. At this point, we can’t even estimate how many cases this vintage will yield; it could be 300 cases, it could be 3,000.

Patience is key. Many winemakers will jump with joy at the sight of healthy and plump Semillon but we have to hold out just a bit longer before we can even start thinking about harvesting our crops. Do you notice those pinkish-purple grapes hidden among this cluster? These are raisins. Sometime later in the fall is when we anticipate the blushing countenance of botrytis, as the grapes begin to show slightly pink hues. Raisins, though very similar in appearance, are wholly different in terms of flavors and are individually removed at the time of harvest. And the waiting game continues.

Wineries around the valley are currently preparing to harvest red varietals. For us at Dolce, the ripening process has only just begun. Stay tuned for monthly updates from the vineyard.

Location, Location, Location: The Dolce Vineyard

on June 13, 2013

From Noble Rot to Liquid Gold – the key to Dolce’s sweetness begins in the vineyard. Our late-harvest wine comes from a delicate blend of Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc grapes grown in Coombsville and Oak Knoll. Inspired by the French Sauternes-style, the Dolce vineyard is gently tended to grow healthy and ripe fruit that will hang longer into the season, with hopes of growing Botrytis. The beneficial mold desiccates the clusters, concentrating sugars and flavors to produce our very special dessert wine.

Our Semillon grapes are grown in Coombsville, at the base of the Vaca Mountains. The crescent-shaped embrace of these mountains protects the vines from wind, allowing the morning mist to linger into midday – a necessity to any vineyard attempting to develop Noble Rot. Large canopies are also grown to cover the fruiting zone, trapping humidity and creating the right conditions for Noble Rot to prosper. To grow these unique grapes for Dolce wine, healthy vines and healthy soils will not suffice; the vineyard requires meticulous care and the cool touch of Mother Nature to take mere grapes and turn them into delightful nectar.